I am trying to put together an incentive plan for my accounting employees. Any ideas on goals to include for accounting personnel?

Kim Supercynski's Profile

Accounting Department Goals

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Hello Kim,

I do not have any experience specifically with incentive plans for Accounting personnel, but here are some general guidelines to consider when designing an effective incentive program (as outlined by SHRM)

-Specify and measure performance - measure and reward what is important, measure results (i.e., productivity, quality, attendance) and behaviors (i.e. returning customer phone calls, accuracy of work. Both results and behaviors must be under the employee's control. Decide whether focus is on short-term or long-term objectives.

-Determine the level of aggregation for the Reward (i.e.,Individual employee, work teams, department, organization as a whole).

-Specify the type of reward - must be valued by employees, clearly linked to expected results or behaviors, proportion of at-risk pay (increases as employees move up the organization).

-Gain employee acceptance - clearly communiccate plan, treat employees fairly, get employee input in design of plan, reward should be given soon after the desired performance is achieved.

I hope this information is helpful.

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You could try setting a team goal with a target of cash generation, cash flow from operations or working capital. These goals are better for Finance people since they don't have the conflicts that earnings may have.

Like any good compensation plan, I would set an earnings or cash flow quailifier so that if the company does poorly, no payment is made but if the company does well, the employees share in the success.

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Good points, Lisa and Lyle.

Kim, you might also want to take a look at this other discussion here on Proformative:

"KPIs for the Accounting Department & Finance Department"
http://www.proformative.com/questions/kpis-accounting-department-finance-department

And, this free white paper titled:

"10 Principles for Building an Effective Human Capital Plan:"

http://www.proformative.com/whitepapers/10-principles-building-effective-human-capital-plan

Proformative also offers online courses, including this one titled,

"How Finance & Accounting Can Plug Economic Leakages at Your Company"

http://www.proformative.com/courses/corporate-finance-accounting-online-training-course

Enjoy!

Best... Sarah

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Some of the performance criteria for accounting personnel can be A/R collections (DSO ratio - overall or by customer groups), A/P timely payment or specific days target depending on corporate goal, early payment discount utilization, error rate per number of transactions processed, monthly closing days (avg or each mo). Criteria does not need to be static, as long as it is communicated well and with enough notice to employees. I agree with the idea of earnings/cash flow qualifier so employees are cognizant of company level performance which ties to teamwork with other departments.

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I have used DSO improvement which is easily measured and improves overall cashflow (a common overall Corporate goal for any organization.
Another measureable goal is days to close for month end reporting.
I have also used a small spot bonus incentive around successful completion of year end audit work without incurring additional fees, beyond the original quoted engagement letter. This encourages upfront completion of audit workpaper, accuracy of year end close, and encourages overall cooperation with the external audit firm (I have also found it encourages my team to push our auditors to ensure they stay on the original timeline as well).
Whatever the incentive I have found it is best to ensure there is an agreed upon measureable result. When that is the case the employees self manage toward that goal because they know EXACTLY what is expected.
Depending on size of the potential bonus payout I agree that some percentage of the payout can be tied to the individual or department goals with another percentage being tied to overall Company performance (EBITDA, Revenue, Cash flow, etc)

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I've set up quarterly incentive plans before for transactional/reporting accounting staff based on equal weighting on 5 criteria (20 points each):

1. Complete monthly billing on time (5th calendar day)
2. Meeting monthly reporting deadline (5th business day)
3. Meeting quarterly recon reporting deadline (20th calendar day)
4. Internal controls compliance and improvement (somewhat subjective measure)
5. Progress on special projects

The final score is multiplied by the total potential incentive bonus amount to determine the actual payout.

Won't work for many individuals but this might get some ideas flowing.

Phil

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Incentive monetary rewards for your Accounting staff needs to be quantitive for easy tracking by staff. I have established collectively with my AR staffs on DSO goals. What made this acceptable was the goals were posted at the beginning of each month and updated weekly as a month to date figure. This way the staff could monitor their success during the month. AR staff had assigned customers that each were responsible for. In fairness I adjusted their DSO calculation for customers accounts beyond their control (bankruptcy, extended payment plans, special extended terms...)all items beyond their control.
Rewards were dispensed by the third days following the monthend. Immediate payouts are essential, quarterly payouts may cause loss of focus in the first month.

Incentives can be given for meeting or exceeding the monthly closing schedule that would be published a week prior to the month end.

Also in the past I have had small token incentives that I could distribute for any special performance or accomplishments no matter how small. I would immediately give these out and would include items such as gift cards for car washes, Amex, Dunkin Donuts, Spa and items of that nature. The immediate recognition was always appreciated and went a long way for building and maintaining morale.

I hope these ideas help you.

Frank Zisa

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Financial recognition is fine, but it's well documented that what people really value is recognition (the public kind). Money is down the list, so is great as a sweetener, but recognition is a must. Some mangers use financial incentives as a way to get out of doing recognition, because legit recognition is harder. But that's why it's valuable. Don't fall into that trap.

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It is fairly obvious that each departments goals must support the company's overall company's goals. What is not obvious sometimes how directly department goals support the company goals and much more so when it comes to G&A departments like Finance. However, once you have this key principle in mind you can delve deeper to develop the right goals

Here's an example.
If the company goals is to profit margins by 5%, a possible accounting goal is to pay reduce late fees by $XXX by paying invoices on a timely basis. If one of you staff is a A/P clerk you can assign that goal and a specific dollar amount. Or as one of the folks above mentioned, if you have an A/R department you can tie back to timely invoicing by a specific date.

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I agree with all the above so I would just add some of the ancillary benefits to these plans and also some cautions to watch out for or address in advance.

I agree public recognition for good work is probably first and foremost to many employees, and can be basically free or low cost for the company to administer. In addition to motivation this also helps to improve employee self confidence.
It can get the department or company into the continuous improvement mode which I think is key to overall success of companies these days and failure to reward employees for this results in employees not motivated to make any improvements, especially at lower levels where they cannot see the impact on bigger picture.

Another impact from this can be good and bad. Creating competitive environment among employees is good to a certain degree, but you must be careful to not go overboard where employees are working against each other to compete for award, since this can actually backfire and result in decreasing overall efficiency, or decreasing quality of work in the race to increase work quantity to goals.

So I think it is important to make sure the quantity goals also include quality requirements, for example on processing quantities of A/P or A/R, that should be measured on error-free quantity or reduced by rejected or corrected items, because you don't gain anything by processing more faster if they must later be re-worked, essentially increasing the processing time vs. decreasing as planned.

Since this can also sometimes cause employees to become too competitive where they actually undermine co-workers, one way to maintain the harmony is to add a reward for the most helpful co-worker as voted by peers in and outside of dept, essentially a reward for good customer service with internal/external customers so employees maintain that teamwork spirit along with friendly competition.

Just 2 more cents to add.

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