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More Women Holding Corporate Positions at the Top

Women are ascending the ranks at corporations.

While many companies' top leadership suites remain dominated by men, more women are climbing the ranks and seizing the reins, Bloomberg reports, and for those executives with families, their partners are picking up more responsibilities at home.

The news outlet cites Leslie Blodget,

While many companies' top leadership suites remain dominated by men, more women are climbing the ranks and seizing the reins, Bloomberg reports, and for those executives with families, their partners are picking up more responsibilities at home.

The news outlet cites Leslie Blodget, the founder of Bare Escentuals, as a prime example of this. She built the makeup company from a small startup to an international conglomerate over 18 years, and her husband left his job in 1995 to care for their son.

While her hard work spanning nearly two decades has certainly paid off (she sold the company to Shiseido for $1.7 billion two years ago), Blodget says she wishes she had done more to balance work and personal life, particularly when it comes to her relationship with her son.

The gap between male and female executives may continue to shrink in the coming year.

A recent study from the Forte Foundation showed the proportion of women comprising business school classes has grown from 26 percent in 2001 to 31 percent currently, The Wall Street Journal reports.

Elissa Ellis Sangster, the executive director of the Forte Foundation, told the news outlet her research indicated that "the organizations that have a higher representation of women in their leadership make better decisions, they have better corporate governance, they have better risk management, they have better returns."