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Most Americans Would Opt To Change Careers, Says Finance Survey

In an economy that faces widespread joblessness and millions who are unable to

In an economy that faces widespread joblessness and millions who are unable to find work for months or longer, many Americans would change careers if they had the choice, according to a Parade Magazine/Yahoo Finance survey.

Lack of satisfaction 

Almost three-fifths, or 60 percent of respondents, indicated that they would change careers if they had the opportunity to do so, according to the Daily Ticker. This comes as many Americans face a job market that offers fewer opportunities than it had in the past.

The job opportunities that exist in the United States may not offer workers tasks that result in a satisfying career, according to 24/7 Wall St. A lot of people feel that if they are stuck working in positions that they don't enjoy very much, they should be receiving better compensation.

"Now we have the McJob that for so many people in the economy goes nowhere," Henry Blodget stated, The Daily Ticker reports. "The whole idea is that [those jobs] are a stepping stone to something else, and it never is. You can understand why they would be unhappy with that."

Aaron Task of The Daily Ticker states that American workers are not just upset by menial jobs, but "there are also people working white collar jobs…. and feeling like they're just on a treadmill, not getting anywhere."

Office politics

More-than half, or 51 percent of respondents, indicated that the best way to advance in their careers is through office politics, the media outlet reports. This was almost twice as much as the 27 percent who specified that hard work was the way to get moved up, and the remainder of participants who said creativity or initiative would help them advance.

Inadequate savings

In addition to the unimpressive data related to people's view of their positions, many respondents indicated a lack of savings they would need to survive job loss or some other financial shock. More-than one-half, or 53 percent of participants, stated they have less than three months worth of salary accumulated in savings, while 15 percent indicated that they have between four and six months worth of salary saved.

In addition, 27 percent indicated that they have no savings at all. This might have something to do with my 56 percent of respondents indicated that they would opt for a 5 percent pay increase instead of more vacation.