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Nielsen Finance Survey Reveals Investment Habits Of Consumers

A survey recently conducted by global research firm Nielsen revealed the inves

A survey recently conducted by global research firm Nielsen revealed the investment habits of consumers across the globe.

Preferences for asset allocation 

Nielsen's Global Survey compiled data from more than 28,000 internet respondents in 56 countries

A survey recently conducted by global research firm Nielsen revealed the investment habits of consumers across the globe.

Preferences for asset allocation 

Nielsen's Global Survey compiled data from more than 28,000 internet respondents in 56 countries about their investment practices and indicates that investments are made by one-third of the world's consumers. Of the people who invest their assets, two-thirds indicated they have a preference for stocks and 52 percent put their money into mutual funds and or unit trusts.

One-third of respondents invest in precious metals including gold and silver, while 32 percent invest in bonds. In addition, 31 percent put their money into structured investment products and 22 percent put their funds in foreign currencies. More-than one-fifth, or 21 percent of participants indicated that they invest in derivatives.

"As global economies continue to focus on ways to accelerate economic growth, consumers show an increased appetite for saving and investing," Oliver Rust, managing director, Nielsen Hong Kong, said in the statement. "It's important for finance and investment companies to know how consumers are investing, saving and paying for goods and what opportunities exist across both the developed and developing economic landscape."

Methods for making investment transactions

The survey data provided by Nielsen indicates that 73 percent of online consumers worldwide utilize online banking to invest their money. Slightly less, or 69 percent, make these transactions at physical banks.

Mobile phones are used by 31 percent of global investors to make transactions of this nature, and 30 percent use land line phones. Another 26 percent utilize investment service providers or investment brokerages that are online. Finally, 22 percent work with financial advisors or planners to make investment transactions.

When segregating respondents by age, Nielsen discovered that people who were older were less likely to use online banking for investment transactions. Three-quarters, or 75 percent of people between the ages of 21 and 29 make investment transactions via online banking, compared with 60 percent of people aged 50-to-59 and 50 percent of people 60 or older.

"Online banking rivals physical branch banking around the globe, especially in Asia-Pacific and North America," said Rust. "And although concerns exist around security, consumers are seeking information through their mobile phones for investment decisions. The adoption of this platform is greatest amongst younger age groups and as the level of smartphone penetration accelerates, mobile usage for investment decisions is expected to grow accordingly."