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What Does it Take to Work at a Startup?

Working for a startup is a labor of love, and it is not for the faint of heart. Employees who are expecting to be part of a steady environment with cushy office space may want to consider other companies, but

Working for a startup is a labor of love, and it is not for the faint of heart. Employees who are expecting to be part of a steady environment with cushy office space may want to consider other companies, but being part of these teams is a great learning experience. Preparing to work at a startup requires professionals to consider a lot of different factors, and an article for the Daily Muse does a good job of spelling out those thinking points.

•Are you ready to embrace change? One of the most consistent things about startups is that they are inconsistent. Employees will shuffle job titles, desk assignments, reporting structures and project plans seemingly by the day, and the office space often changes more than the seasons. Professionals who believe they can thrive in this environment may want to consider working at some of the newest startup companies in town.

•Are you ready to carry out many tasks? Unlike many traditional titles, job titles are things of the past at startup firms. Those who are brought on as staff should be prepared to take on any role and thrive in it. Employees at a startup often have to find their niche, and when they do, the business's owner will often reward them by giving them responsibility over certain processes. Professionals who choose to work at a startup should not have too much pride to do certain things in the workplace.

•Are you ready to embrace new staff members? Many employees at startups work long, strenuous hours to get the company off the ground, and then they have to deal with firm owners bringing in more experienced staff to help with growth efforts. This can be tough for employees to deal with as they have put their blood, sweat and tears into getting the company to where it is today. It's important to remember that these new staff members are on the same team and they are going to help the firm reach new heights.

Startup pay is different than what many believe
After understanding what it takes to work at a startup, professionals also need to learn that many of the myths about the compensation that staff members earn are simply not true. According to an article written by Noam Wasserman, a professor at Harvard Business School, there are several misconceptions people have about how employees at startups at compensated. Below is a list of some of the myths Wasserman hopes to dispel.

•CEOs take home much more than their executive team: Wasserman spent years attempting to dispel this myth, and in his research he found that CEOs at startups make 1.7 times the amount of members of their executive team, and the reason for this is because that have an equity in the company that is 6.2 times the next highest-ranking member of the team.

•Founders are the most highly paid: Startups often pay their employees base on data compiled from corporate performance management tools, not by who originally founded the company. The research revealed that at 59 percent of startups, founders are not the highest-paid member of the team, while only 17 percent of firms can say this assumption is true.

•Location plays a large role: While many startups are located in places such as Silicon Valley and New York City, the place where the company is located has little or no bearing on how much employees make. According to Wasserman's data, the Midwest is the only area that consistently has startups that pay employees less than other areas.

Professionals who are looking for new positions may use this valuable information to decide if they want to work at a startup. Do you believe you have what it takes to work at a startup?

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