more-arw search

Q&A Forum

Association of Certified Chief Financial Officers

Has anyone heard of this organization? http://www.accfo.com/ My concerns based on their website is: Your resume is reviewed and Certification is granted, so long as you are a member. If you're "Certified" you're "Certified", although you may not be "active" (just like being licensed a CPA. Who are these Certification Committee members. One aspect that I find appealing is that if you don't meet their standards, they return the fee. This organization might be a step in the right direction.

Answers

Ken Stumder
Title: Finance Director / Controller
Company: Ken Stumder, CPA
(Finance Director / Controller, Ken Stumder, CPA) |

Not an altogether bad idea but aside from the tenure requirements the rest seems rather subjective. Not to be a stickler, but they need to fix a typo on their home page.

"The Association's email portal and membership meetings enable CFOs to share experience and expertise useful in addressing the administrative, accounting and fiance issues they commonly face."

The Proformative site meets many of these objectives without offering a "CFO certification". And if experience is the basis for the certification, it seems to be moot.

Anonymous
(Controller) |

Association of CFO's = fine. Calling them "certified" CFO's is nonsense. There are CFO's of 3 person finance shops and there are Accounting Managers running teams of 25 people who could blow that CFO out of the water. To imply that title/tenure itself is indicative of a "certified" level of capability is very misleading.

Chris Holtzer
Title: Senior Manager - Strategic Analysis
Company: Sargento
(Senior Manager - Strategic Analysis, Sargento) |

You make a very good point. However, most "certifications" are based on standardized tests. Is a test any more representative than title and tenure? All certification programs are intended to certify that you have a base of knowledge. They do not represent your ability to perform, though for some reason that is how many employers interpret them. Only your references/reputation can really attest the this most critical attribute.

Robert Glover
Title: N/A
Company: N/A
(N/A, N/A) |

Wayne, Chris's answer is a perfect rebuttal to your CPA vs. non-CPA question that pops up every so often. All the CPA designation means is that you studied and passed (albeit a difficult) test it says nothing about how you deal with day to day situations.
But it sure is a great way for HR types to pre-judge the resume stack

Topic Expert
Wayne Spivak
Title: President & CFO
Company: SBAConsulting.com
LinkedIn Profile
(President & CFO, SBAConsulting.com) |

We just love HR types, don't we.

I agree that just because you past some (difficult) tests, doesn't mean you know what you are doing, but HR types just love letters after their names.

Case in point, a friend of ours is a Real Estate Salesperson. She has more letters after her name that are in her first, middle and last names. I asked her does anyone know what they mean - her answer no, but they are impressed anyway...

1368 views

Get Free Membership

By signing up, you will receive emails from Proformative regarding Proformative programs, events, community news and activity. You can withdraw your consent at any time. Contact Us.

Business Exchange

Browse the Business Exchange to find information, resources and peer reviews to help you select the right solution for your business.

Learn more

Contribute to Community

If you’re interested in learning more about contributing to your Proformative community, we have many ways for you to get involved. Please email content@proformative.com to learn more about becoming a speaker or contributing to the blogs/Q&A Forum.