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Fallout With An Employer Of 8 Years And Moving On

Linda StClaire's Profile

I have had a falling out with my employer of eight years. I honestly do not know what caused the issue, and they will not explain-just a new Director of HR and suddenly I am persona non-grata. How do I move on and look for a new, exciting, challenging position with an 8 year employment gap? I am over 50, so I can't claim childrearing. Anyone, have suggestions?

Answers

EMERSON GALFO
Title: CFO
Company: C-Suite Services
LinkedIn Profile
(CFO, C-Suite Services) |

Don't hide the employer and don't make it a gap. Tell the interviewer the truth! That you do NOT know! As my 6 year old nephew said to me me when I visited them this holidays ..."it is what it is" ...(i know...i was shocked too...kids say the darnest things)

Linda StClaire
Title: VP Finance
Company: Extron Inc.
(VP Finance, Extron Inc.) |

Your later post, was an "aha" moment: I would not compromise my principles or fiduciary responsibility, that hits the nail on the head, and presents the matter in a non-judgmental way; your nephew was right: it is what it is! And I do not compromise. I do not need to clarify anything else. Thank you.

EMERSON GALFO
Title: CFO
Company: C-Suite Services
LinkedIn Profile
(CFO, C-Suite Services) |

Linda, glad I was of help.

Anonymous
(Vice President of Technology) |

I am experiencing the SAME THING!!

Ernie Humphrey CTP
Title: CEO & COO
Company: Treasury Careers
LinkedIn Profile
(CEO & COO, Treasury Careers) |

If it was truly the Director of HR, then you should have references from your employer of 8-years. I have always found that honesty works well, as I have faced a similar situation. If you find the right fit, the employer will focus on your skills and what you have to offer. Quality senior level finance professionals are not easy to come by from what I hear constantly from CFOs.

A job search can be daunting at best. If you are not active on LinkedIn and do not have a solid LinkedIn profile then that is worth your attention. Then start working your network. You have more connections than you realize if you have not been actively managing your network. Also, there is so much good free information around an effective job search, you do not need to pay anyone for solid advice in this arena. Best of Luck.

Linda StClaire
Title: VP Finance
Company: Extron Inc.
(VP Finance, Extron Inc.) |

You know, I just barely started looking at Linked in-I am not a fan of social media, and wary of LinkedIn, but based on your advice, I will work on my profile.

David Smith
Title: Manager
Company: Private
(Manager, Private) |

I'm kind of surprised that no one has suggested trying to figure it out with the current employer.

What if your beliefs about how you're being treated are off-target? What if a conversation or two could put things back on a good footing? You have little if anything to lose and much to gain.

Of course, at the same time start looking. Your chances of finding your next opportunity are much higher while still gainfully employed... especially in your 50s.

Good luck!

Linda StClaire
Title: VP Finance
Company: Extron Inc.
(VP Finance, Extron Inc.) |

I'm afraid that the relationship is irreconcilable-although still don't know why-they have made that clear. I am still technically employed, so I am trying to move on, while still employed.

Ernie Humphrey CTP
Title: CEO & COO
Company: Treasury Careers
LinkedIn Profile
(CEO & COO, Treasury Careers) |

If no one protects you from being let go then that says something, quite a bit in most cases. I was fortunate enough to have a few CEOs share that with me.

Anonymous
(Controller) |

I disagree that is "says something" when no one protects you. It depends on who is making the decisions and where they rank in the power chain. Some battles, as much as you'd like to fight, are just not something you can afford to take on.

Anonymous
(Controller) |

I have gone through this as well. Tell the truth. The reality is that something changed and you will never find out what really happened. The fact that they won't tell you is an indication that they don't have a "good" reason, they just want to make a change. From your perspective, your former employer decided to make changes and decided your services were no longer required and that is why you are seeking a new opportunity.

Ernie Humphrey CTP
Title: CEO & COO
Company: Treasury Careers
LinkedIn Profile
(CEO & COO, Treasury Careers) |

Well, I have learned that if you are valued enough someone will protect you, that is a fact. I have had colleagues tell me they have done this for me. Also, I have protected people that reported to me from getting fired. That is just life at times. Does it stink, yes!

Anonymous
(Accounting Analyst) |

I disagree wholeheartedly. Yes, in many companies, someone will protect you if you are truly valued.

However, there are companies (many of them) that you risk your own employment by standing up for or attempting to protect others. I have seen it first hand. It all depends on the culture, the atmosphere, and the employer.

Ernie Humphrey CTP
Title: CEO & COO
Company: Treasury Careers
LinkedIn Profile
(CEO & COO, Treasury Careers) |

Yes, I have put my job on the line for people that work for me and others have done the same for me. Not easy to do, but when I believe in something I do what I need to be done so my personal and business integrity remain in alignment.

Anonymous
(AR Supervisor/Credit and Collections) |

Going through the same thing here at my company - new executive management has new ideas but not sharing much information and listening to just a very select few persons who have their own agenda. Latest department reorganization made it very clear not all of us are welcome to stay. It is what it is, and best suggestion is continue to do your work to best of your abilities but start working on looking for a new job. Start really thinking about what you want your next career move to look like and what a really satisfying position would entail for you. Best of Luck

Anonymous
(Chief Financial Officer) |

Original Poster, can I suggest that you contact Proformative and ask them to make your post anonymous? This is not the type of conversation you want to have on the Internet.

I went to your firm's Wikipedia page and you are listed and I went to your website and your accounting manager is listed but not you. That's bizarre.

You need to get your name off your post and RIGHT now. If I were your CEO I would be getting legal advice on walking you out the door.

Linda StClaire
Title: VP Finance
Company: Extron Inc.
(VP Finance, Extron Inc.) |

Used careful wording-merely asking peer advice, so many attorney's already involved.

Rich Robins
Title: Accountant
Company: Tec
(Accountant, Tec) |

If it's certain that you're done, Resign before involuntary termination. Leave on your terms. Much easier to explain.

Anonymous
(Executive Managing Director & CEO) |

I was 15 years dedicated with one CEO and then it ended with little explanation. Sometimes I think you get to know them too well and they find that threatening and uncomfortable. I stressed for months about any possible reasons and finally gave up trying to figure it out. I accepted that I did nothing wrong and I will never know what rationalization took place to justify this behavior. When a relationship becomes toxic, it is time to move on.

Anonymous
(Accounting Analyst) |

Ernie, I agree with you and have stood up for people, tactfully, carefully, and in such a way that the higher up will (hopefully) take it as advice to help the company and not as a fight. However, many people will not do the same.

EMERSON GALFO
Title: CFO
Company: C-Suite Services
LinkedIn Profile
(CFO, C-Suite Services) |

Just a general statement ....

Don't concern yourself with what other people will or will not do. It is called principles. Don't make what other people WONT do or the company's culture as an excuse for not standing up or acting on your principles. Either you act based on your principles or you don't...that is YOUR decision. As it is, you are just "justifying/rationalizing" why you didn't act based on your principles.

That is like saying..."I have an extravagant expense report because the culture allows it and a lot of people are doing it even if I think it is not right."

Anonymous
(Finance Director / Controller) |

No reason given? Sounds like the HR Director showed up, sorted everybody's salary from high to low and started making "recommendations". Or some similar activity that is not being shared. Anyone else being similarly treated - that could explain quite a bit.

P.S. Agree to leave on your CV and not try to explain as an employment gap. What interviewer can believe you "underperformed" for 8 years.

Michelle Rogers
Title: Principle
Company: MR Consulting
(Principle, MR Consulting) |

I agree - keep the job on your resume and ensure it highlights key initiatives that you drove which had a positive impact on the organization.

You may wish to obtain references from work colleagues when you start interviewing for other jobs.

Be respectful and honest - taking the high road, which most times isn't the easiest, always offers the best view.

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